Writing for money is the dream, but it can turn into a nightmare. After all, you don’t get paid if you can’t meet those all-important deadlines … And the mere thought of rushing the work can make you desperate. It’s a pressure that’s not easy to handle.

The good news is: you’re not alone. All professional writers have experienced this, so the most committed ones have come up with hacks that keep them going. Here’s a few useful hacks to keep you going and make you money as a writer:

writing-success

1) Become your own worst critic

One of the great things about being a freelance writer is that you don’t have a superior breathing in your neck all the time. But this also means you have to kick your OWN arse!

So, when you get stuck, go through the work you’ve already completed. What mistakes do you notice? Fix them! As you continue making the piece better, you’ll keep getting ideas. You’ll be writing in full speed before you know it. MORE: 5 Questions To Help You Edit Your Work

2) Be Very, Very Organised

Use Pinterest or Pocket to keep all sources of inspiration in an organised way. Bookmark all articles that inspire you, as well as surveys, statistics, and research you can use to support your arguments. Don’t forget to use a good calendar, too. Google Calendar is a classic, but you can also try Cozi if you don’t like using what everyone else does. Or, you can write your daily/weekly schedules with the good-old pen-and-paper method. That always works.

When you develop a system that helps you organise all resources, your job as a writer will become less chaotic. Honest!

3) Network, Network, Network!

When you’re writing for money, it’s important to find the right clients. You can do that if you create profiles on platforms like Upwork, which connect writers with people who pay for their work.

Is that enough? No. If you limit your activity on these platforms, you’ll remain within the limits of being a ghost writer. You need to get your name out there.

LinkedIn is the solution. Create a brilliant profile and share links to your special publications. Moreover, be active on LinkedIn’s blog. Publish great content and you’ll make connections with important people in your niche. The greater your authority as a writer becomes, the more opportunities for jobs you’ll get.

Maintaining your own blog also belongs in the networking activities. Stay true to your schedule and publish high-quality pieces, even if they don’t bring you tons of money at first. As you make your blog more popular, you will start earning money from referral links and ads.

4) Polish Up Your Negotiating Skills

If you want to make a living writing, the first thing you need to do is pick the good offers. Some clients or publishers pay better than others. You want the ones who value your work fairly. When you notice that a client doesn’t commit to a payment schedule, you need to renegotiate the conditions of your collaboration.

Be as straightforward as possible. If someone forgot to pay, remind them. Just as importantly, if you realise you can’t complete the work on time? Don’t just ignore this! Instead, inform the client as soon as possible and explain why you need the deadline to be extended. If you know how to present your case, they will understand and you’ll still get your payment even if things don’t go as perfectly as planned.

5) Don’t Stop Looking for Opportunities!

When you find a client or website that pays well for your content, you may get stuck in a routine. You’ll be writing on the same topics over and over again. You’ll get bored, inevitably! Boredom leads to distractions, and distractions lead to decreased effectiveness. You know what that means: less work done and a lower paycheck. You can prevent that decline if you keep finding fresh opportunities that boost your potential.

Keep exploring platforms like WriteThisMoment. This one, in particular, features well-paying writing jobs that go well beyond article writing. Some clients ask for magazine content, others want you to write for blogs, and you can even land a job for fiction/poetry writing.

REMEMBER: You’re the one who’s responsible for making your own job diverse. With so many opportunities, you don’t have excuses for getting stuck. MORE: Connecting with Other Writers, Filmmakers & Agents Online

Most Important of All: Get Out of That Box!

You don’t have to stick to any rules when you’re a writer. You’re expected to be as creative as possible with the results you deliver. Transfer that creative approach to the way you work, too. Yes, you need a schedule and some level of organisation, but that doesn’t mean you have to be stuck in a routine. Routines lead to despair. Despair leads to a mental and emotional blockade.

REMEMBER: you are not writing for the money. Such an approach would keep you stuck inside the box. You are earning money because you write well. Now we’re talking! Keep evolving and keep doing your best. The money will come.

These are the steps that will get you there:

The journey to becoming a well-paid writer is NOT easy. But with the right approach and enough persistency, you’ll get there!

BIO: Lisa Wheatly works for Top Aussie Writers in her spare time, where she creates unbiased essay service reviews. Lisa believes analytical thinking and an enquiring mind are her strongest points, and she does her best to put them to good use. Lisa is a consultant of young entrepreneurs, and she feels that her knowledge of the human mind allows her to accurately assess the abilities of the young business people.

Looking for writing jobs?

Screen Shot 2017-04-12 at 09.04.28Contena enables freelancers to write from anywhere, aggregating the best freelance and remote jobs for writers, editors and content creators. I like the fact this service is so comprehensive, with full details and support for users. B2W only recommends products and services it trusts, so if you want more info, CLICK HERE.

For B2W offers and free stuff first, join my EMAIL LIST

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>