So, I’ve written A LOT on this blog about how writers obsess over their dialogue and why they shouldn’t. This is because too often, writers fall in love with their dialogue and end up telling the story via talk alone. Nooooooooooo!

However, if you writers *are* going to obsess on dialogue, then you could do a lot worse than finding out exactly what dialogue really IS. Shockingly, many writers don’t differentiate their characters’ speech patterns enough, so what they *think* is cool and interesting, is actually samey and boring to read.

If we consider a book like The Maze Runner by James Dashner, this writer actually created a whole new dialect for The Gladers. He’s not the only writer to do this and really add that ‘je ne se quois’ to his writing, too. Could you do the same?

So, take a look at this great periodic table of figures of speech – understanding what language truly IS can only help you craft great dialogue for your screenplay or novel.  It also can’t hurt for your writing in general, too. Download & pass it on!

For B2W offers and free stuff first, join my EMAIL LIST

2 Responses to INFOGRAPHIC: All About Dialogue – A Periodic Table

  1. Fran Connor says:

    I don’t know if it is my equipment or the site’s. It can’t read the information below the periodic table as it is too blurred.

    • Lucy V Hay says:

      If you’re having trouble, click on the infographic & it will take you through to the Visual.ly site where it will be become bigger if you click again on it

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>