Remember, we live in a visual and demanding age. Audiences are more media literate than they’ve EVER been and readers are more sophisticated. They simply will not wait for a story to start.

But what does this mean? Well, every writer – novelist or screenwriter – HAS to hit the ground running. In other words, character AND story has to be introduced hand-in-hand.

If your draft smells of set up as I call it – ie: “HERE are my characters, I am introducing you to them … and five pages in, the story begins!!” – we don’t like it.

So if a draft hits the ground running, we are PLUNGED into the action via a characters’ reactions to what is happening to them in the story.

This doesn’t you HAVE to start with a massive event (though plenty of stories do), OR that slow burn techniques are frowned upon. You can do whatever you want, as long as it’s dramatic and fits the type of story you’re telling and the preferences of the audience you are targeting.

So, remember:



For B2W offers and free stuff first, join my EMAIL LIST

4 Responses to Writing Adages Explained: ‘Hit The Ground Running’

  1. Pauline Hetrick says:

    Your teaser. Has me buying your book on “Hit the GroundRunning” Every writer wants to know if they have the right hook. So if there a even a tidbit on if I have started Moments in the right place or that I’ve done it correctly, it will be worth it’s weight in gold.So here”s to you Lucy V Hay and your book.

    • Lucy V Hay says:

      Hey, thanks Pauline! Yes I talk in the book about hooks and the beginning of scripts in particular, so hope you enjoy it! 😀

  2. York says:

    Great advice Lucy. “Catch my reader early” is my motto too. Thanks…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>